Comment

3 Lessons Magazines Taught Me About How to Get Your Audience Clicking

In a past (career) life, I worked as a fact-checker and copy editor for national magazines. That included fact-checking and copy editing the magazine cover, which meant I got to see all of the other editors' notes on the "cover lines"—those enticing titles framing the cover girl. I learned how editors construct cover lines and how they choose what to call out on the cover. 

Although I never worked for Cosmo, theirs are my favorite. Notice a trend? 

Sexy sex sells sexy magazines. 

Sexy sex sells sexy magazines. 

Lesson 1: Write titles from the point of view of your audience

The toughest, and the best editors excel at asking this question of every story:

"Why should we care?" 

Once they've answered that question, they often slap that answer on the cover. When I thought about the title for this blog post, at first I thought of the title, "3 Lessons I Learned from Magazines." 

But why would you care about what I learned at magazines? I'll tell you why: because it'll help you get clicks! 

Lesson 2: Try numbers in the title. 

Did you notice the title of my post? 3 lessons. THREE. People want to know what they're going to get when they open a magazine (or click a link). Including a number in a post works so well for web content, and here's why: it lets the audience know that they will be able to SCAN the article. Somehow, THREE points will be highlighted. They'll be able to quickly scan these points and pick them out.  

Another way magazines use the number in the cover line is to represent an abundance of info. "YOU'LL LEARN SO MUCH IF YOU BUY ME!" screams the magazine.  

When I worked at Gourmet, we would often verify a cover line like "32 Tips and Tricks for the Juiciest Chicken." Those tips might be found throughout the magazine, and we would page through the magazine to verify that there were 32 and that we hadn't missed any. But the overall effect of the cover line gave the impression that if you opened the magazine, you'd be swimming in tips and tricks! (You can see another example of that in the 99 SEX Questions cover line in the Cosmo photo above). 

Lesson 3: Learn from experience. 

As a content creator, when you share something and see a lot more engagement than usual (likes, comments, shares, clickthroughs), take note!

In Cosmo's case, they know that cover lines that feature SEX (NAKED is a close second) sell magazines. They have tested and learned. So they continue to get the word SEX on the cover, month after month. 

In your world, this might mean you keep blogging about topics that you've seen your audience respond to in the past. You try different things until you land on something! And you re-share content that engaged them in the past. Don't be afraid to repost popular content. 

 

Comment

Comment

Try This When Sharing Your Content to Your Facebook Brand Page

BBM created a lovely graphic to promote our interview, using a cute photo of a very exhausted mom and dad, and a very sweet baby who did not yet sleep through the night. 

BBM created a lovely graphic to promote our interview, using a cute photo of a very exhausted mom and dad, and a very sweet baby who did not yet sleep through the night. 

Today, the Brilliant Business Moms posted my conversation with them about their Facebook brand page. They do a great job sharing their brand on social media. We talked about a lot of things, but one theme I returned to over and over: Put yourself in their shoes. 

For example, if you are going to blog about a particular topic, always think about titling the blog post using the same keywords that your audience might use to Google it.

You want to do this not only because it may help your page come up in Google search results, but also because when you share post to Facebook that has a title you're audience is interested in, they are just plain more likely to click. If you want your audience to read your blogs, listen to your podcasts, and watch your videos, you have to explain what's in it for them. The title is a great place to do that. 

 

 

Comment

Comment

Tactics: Staying on Track

It's been a busy week. After running a million errands over the past four days, my husband and I realized we have at least one rat living in the wall of our house. The exterminator came and plugged the hole where he came in, but he wouldn't promise the rat couldn't find another way in. 

All of this is to say that I ran out of time today and didn't get a chance to write my blog. But I promised myself, come hell or high water, I'd blog twice a week on Tuesday and Thursday. It says so on my home page

I can't advise clients to blog consistently, create a schedule and stick to it, and not do that myself. 

So, it's still Thursday here on the west coast, and I'm blogging. I'm blogging a yawp of persistence and doing what I said I would do. 

Comment

Your "Why" and Their "Why": Honing in on Your Call to Action

Comment

Your "Why" and Their "Why": Honing in on Your Call to Action

So many people who are using social media to build their business have never heard of or thought much about "CTAs," yet the call to action is a big deal when it comes to social media marketing. In fact, it's the difference between a social media presence that builds your business, and using social media just for fun.

Comment

Comment

Measuring Success: Split Tests and Social Media

You can conduct very effective tests using your posts on social media. They may not be perfect split-tests, but they can provide enough data to help you decide whether saying something like "Click here" works better for your audience than saying, "Get it now." Here are some options. 

Comment

Comment

What’s a Vanity Metric? (And Why You Should Care)

A woman who had launched her website recently was asking, “What is a good number of page views your first month?” 

You may have asked the same question as you try to build your audience. After all, if you want to build your audience, doesn’t that mean you want more page views? 

Yes and no. 

Comment

Starting in The Middle

Comment

Starting in The Middle

"When I sat down to write, I remember staring at the blank screen thinking, 'I have no idea what I'm doing.' There's this moment of fear before I ever write anything."

Sound familiar? 

Comment